Klass Law Group

Colorado's Premier Landlord-Only Law Firm

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Colorado Landlords - You Once Again Have A Choice

Klass Law Group - Colorado’s Premier Landlord-Only Law Firm

Representing you with integrity, honesty and more than 100 years of collective experience in Colorado landlord law, the Klass Law Group helps landlords deal with troublesome tenants in a timely and cost effective manner, consistent with ensuring that your landlord rights are vigorously defended.

Our honest, affordable and successful expertise in Colorado landlord law has been sought by nationally and locally based landlords and management companies operating throughout Colorado. If you are a landlord or property manager who owns or manages commercial or residential property in the State of Colorado, we can help you correct the behavior of, and if necessary, evict troublesome tenants.

2109 S. Wadsworth Blvd | Suite 202 | Lakewood, CO 80227
Phone: (303) 758-0500 | Fax: (303) 969-0501

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September 2017 Legal Tidbit

Posted on

The New Yorker, July 31, 2017

Question: What can I do with a tenant who addresses me and my management staff in a rude, foul-mouthed, threatening, abusive and/or insulting manner?

Answer: Your written lease should have language in it that prohibits the tenant from interfering with the operation of the management staff, or the property. (If not, add it to your lease.) The behavior is a lease violation. Notify the tenant in writing that the behavior is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. If it persists, notify the tenant in writing that all communications with staff must be in writing, that he not to enter the management office, and that if he enters the management office he will be trespassing and the police will be called and asked to arrest him. You may also serve a Demand for Compliance or Possession giving the tenant 3 days to terminate his unacceptable behavior. If the behavior is repeated after the expiration of 3 days from the Demand, serve a Notice to Quit for Repeat Violation and, if necessary, evict.

August 2017 Legal Tidbit

Posted on

The New Yorker, July 31, 2017

Question: When is the written accounting of the retention of the tenant’s security deposit due?

Answer: The Colorado security deposit law requires that the landlord’s written accounting explaining the use of the tenant’s security deposit be sent “within one month after the termination of a lease or surrender and acceptance of the premises, whichever occurs last… unless the lease agreement specifies a longer period of time, but not to exceed sixty days.” So, if a tenant signs a one year lease on March 1, 2017, ending February 28, 2018, but abandons the rental or is evicted on June 1, 2017, since the lease does not expire until the following February 28, the accounting is not due until a month (or up to sixty days) after February 28, 2018! However, don’t wait. If possible, send the accounting within several weeks of the date that you receive the rental premises back into your possession.

July 2017 Legal Tidbit

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The 71st Colorado Legislature was busy this term on behalf of tenants. They passed Senate Bill 245 changing the minimum time period for a landlord to give notice to a month-to-month tenant that his tenancy is to end, or that the rent is going up, from seven (7) days to twenty-one (21) days. Governor Hickenlooper is expected to sign the bill into law. The new rule is set to go into effect on August 9, 2017. Assuming that a month-to-month tenant pays his rent on the first of the month, if a landlord wishes to terminate the tenancy and require the tenant to move out, the landlord’s Notice to Quit must be served upon the tenant or posted on his door at least 21 days before the last day of the month. Note that, as before, while Colorado law does not require the landlord to have or give a reason for such termination, the landlord still must have a non-discriminatory reason for the termination of the tenancy under federal and Colorado housing discrimination laws.

June 2017 Legal Tidbit

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Question: Can a victim of stalking or sexual assault get out of his or her lease?

Answer: Apropos of the above cartoon, the answer in Colorado shall soon be yes. During the recent legislative session, the Colorado House and Senate passed a new law adding victims of stalking and sexual assault to victims of domestic violence as persons who may vacate their rentals and terminate their leases regardless of the terms of the written leases. Victims must provide their landlord with a police report or statement from a qualified medical professional and must actually vacate. Once they move out, the lease is terminated and the tenant's liability will be limited to one additional month’s rent beyond the move-out date. Governor Hickenlooper is expected to sign the bill into law shortly.

May 2017 Legal Tidbit

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Question: What does a resident need to show in order to obtain a reasonable accommodation or modification under Fair Housing law?

Answer: A resident must have a disability as defined within Fair Housing law, the requested accommodation (change in property policy, practice, or procedure) or modification (change in the physical condition of the property) must be reasonable, and must be related to the resident’s disability so as to allow the resident the use and enjoyment of the property.