Klass Law Group

Colorado's Premier Landlord-Only Law Firm

Denver Skyline

Colorado Landlords - You Once Again Have A Choice

Klass Law Group - Colorado’s Premier Landlord-Only Law Firm

Representing you with integrity, honesty and more than 100 years of collective experience in Colorado landlord law, the Klass Law Group helps landlords deal with troublesome tenants in a timely and cost effective manner, consistent with ensuring that your landlord rights are vigorously defended.

Our honest, affordable and successful expertise in Colorado landlord law has been sought by nationally and locally based landlords and management companies operating throughout Colorado. If you are a landlord or property manager who owns or manages commercial or residential property in the State of Colorado, we can help you correct the behavior of, and if necessary, evict troublesome tenants.

2109 S. Wadsworth Blvd | Suite 202 | Lakewood, CO 80227
Phone: (303) 758-0500 | Fax: (303) 969-0501

© Klass Law Group   |  All Rights Reserved  |  Privacy Policy  |  Powered by 2140 Interactive

July 2017 Legal Tidbit

Posted on

The 71st Colorado Legislature was busy this term on behalf of tenants. They passed Senate Bill 245 changing the minimum time period for a landlord to give notice to a month-to-month tenant that his tenancy is to end, or that the rent is going up, from seven (7) days to twenty-one (21) days. Governor Hickenlooper is expected to sign the bill into law. The new rule is set to go into effect on August 9, 2017. Assuming that a month-to-month tenant pays his rent on the first of the month, if a landlord wishes to terminate the tenancy and require the tenant to move out, the landlord’s Notice to Quit must be served upon the tenant or posted on his door at least 21 days before the last day of the month. Note that, as before, while Colorado law does not require the landlord to have or give a reason for such termination, the landlord still must have a non-discriminatory reason for the termination of the tenancy under federal and Colorado housing discrimination laws.

June 2017 Legal Tidbit

Posted on

Question: Can a victim of stalking or sexual assault get out of his or her lease?

Answer: Apropos of the above cartoon, the answer in Colorado shall soon be yes. During the recent legislative session, the Colorado House and Senate passed a new law adding victims of stalking and sexual assault to victims of domestic violence as persons who may vacate their rentals and terminate their leases regardless of the terms of the written leases. Victims must provide their landlord with a police report or statement from a qualified medical professional and must actually vacate. Once they move out, the lease is terminated and the tenant's liability will be limited to one additional month’s rent beyond the move-out date. Governor Hickenlooper is expected to sign the bill into law shortly.

May 2017 Legal Tidbit

Posted on

Question: What does a resident need to show in order to obtain a reasonable accommodation or modification under Fair Housing law?

Answer: A resident must have a disability as defined within Fair Housing law, the requested accommodation (change in property policy, practice, or procedure) or modification (change in the physical condition of the property) must be reasonable, and must be related to the resident’s disability so as to allow the resident the use and enjoyment of the property.

April 2017 Legal Tidbit

Posted on

Question: What is a Demand for Compliance or Possession used for?

Answer: This notice is used when a tenant has violated one or more terms of his lease, including a failure to pay rent. It gives the tenant three days within which to bring himself within compliance of the terms of the lease.

March 2017 Legal Tidbit

Posted on

Question: Must I accept an applicant who will use a Section 8 voucher to pay his/her rent?

Answer: Generally, no. Because of the additional obligations imposed on a landlord in the acceptance of Section 8 voucher tenants, such as the requirement to enter into a “HAP Agreement” with, and submit to a property inspection by, the administering housing authority, a landlord is not obligated to accept Section 8 voucher tenants. However, the U.S. Housing Act does require landlords to accept a new Sec. 8 applicant when the property has accepted other such applicants. So, generally, it is “take one, take all.” This rule is narrow, however. A landlord who allowed some existing tenants who ran into financial problems to use Sec. 8 vouchers may still refuse to accept a new applicant for housing who would use a Sec. 8 voucher, even where the applicant sought the use of the voucher as a reasonable accommodation of a disability. Efforts by some cities to require landlords to accept Sec. 8 vouchers have so far been unsuccessful.